Posted by: lemmod | May 10, 2010

Sacajawea

There are many noteworthy events in American Indian history, however, not only major events are important but there are numerous historical figures that played a significant role in American Indian history. One famous American Indian who was pretty well known was Sacajawea. Sacajawea was famous for her efforts with Lewis and Clark in an attempt to help lead them to the Pacific Ocean. She was technically not a part of the expedition party and only got involved because of her husband. Her husband, Toussaint Charbonneau was originally brought on the journey of Lewis and Clark to help translate, and he decided it would be best for Sacajawea to come as well to help communicate with any other Indian tribes they may run into. The expedition was a long journey which consisted of many hardships, although, Sacajawea never seemed to complain except for one time near the end of their journey at the Columbia River. During this time, it was reported that a whale had been seen and after traveling a long time to see a monstrous water creature and large waters, Sacajawea was excited to see the whale but did not get to see it since it already died. However, they were able to buy 35 pounds of blubber from people near the skeleton. Eventually, Sacajawea died after the journey except the origin of her death is unknown. Some believe she died in 1813 from a fever, while the Shoshone Indian tribe believes she lived until 1884 where she used the rest of her life to travel west and was buried between her son and sister’s son after her death.

For more info check out http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nwa/sacajawea.html

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